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Circumcision Not Solution to HIV - Museveni, Uganda Pres.
 
 
  New Vision (Kampala)
December 21, 2006
Posted to the web December 21, 2006
 
Cyprian Musoke
Kampala
 
PRESIDENT Yoweri Museveni has warned about statements that circumcision reduces the risk of HIV/AIDS.
 
"These days, there are many confusing messages. One of them is that if you are circumcised, you are less likely to catch AIDS even if you behave recklessly. Now what sort of message is that?" the President asked.
 
"Sixty percent less at risk? Then what about the forty percent? If you have got one hundred circumcised people and they live recklessly, and sixty percent don't get AIDS but forty do, what are you looking for?" he mused.
 
Addressing the international medical students' convention on child health at Makerere University on Wednesday, Museveni said such messages were sending wrong signals to the population, and caused apathy in the fight against HIV/AIDS. He said Uganda's success was because of the clear message that there is no cure at all for AIDS.
 
"The way we controlled AIDS was because of an unequivocal message that there is a sickness which is not curable, you get it through sex, and when you get it you die. Therefore, avoid all risky sexual behaviours," he said.
 
The President advised young people to abstain from sex through exercise and sports, until they had found a partner for marriage.
 
"What sort of sex is that when you are going out with somebody you are not sure of? Oba alina akawuka? Oba talina? (I wonder whether my partner is infected or not?)" he exclaimed amid laughter.
 
Ugandan president rejects circumcision/HIV study
December 22, 2006, 15:30
 
Yoweri Museveni, the Ugandan President has condemned a new study showing that male circumcision reduces the risk of HIV infection during sex, saying it sent out a dangerous message. Today, Museveni said there were many confusing messages about HIV/AIDS. Museveni said: "One of them is that if you are circumcised, you are less likely to catch AIDS even if you behave recklessly. Now what sort of message is that?"
 
A study conducted this month by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) in western Kenya and eastern Uganda, where circumcision is a common practice, found that it (circumcision) reduced the risk of infection by 48-53 percent.
 
Museveni rejected the study's conclusion, saying Uganda's apparent success at controlling the virus -- official figures said prevalence fell from 30 percent to 6 percent in the early 1990s -- was by telling youths to abstain from sex.
 
132,000 new infections occurred in Uganda in 2005
The study had said circumcision is to be seen as "only part of a broader HIV prevention strategy that includes limiting ... sexual partners and using condoms". Campaigners said Uganda's HIV/AIDS strategy has been hijacked by right-wing Christian groups, mostly from the United States, who promote abstaining from sex at the expense of condoms.
 
The Uganda AIDS Commission, a government body, this month said 132,000 new infections occurred in Uganda in 2005, but prevalence remained stable at between 6-7 percent. It linked failure to reduce prevalence to less condom use.
 
Many health workers think the official figures are too low. - Reuters
 
Circumcision not solution to HIV - Museveni
 
Thursday, 21st December, 2006
http://www.newvision.co
 
By Cyprian Musoke
 
PRESIDENT Yoweri Museveni has warned about statements that circumcision reduces the risk of HIV/AIDS.
 
"These days, there are many confusing messages. One of them is that if you are circumcised, you are less likely to catch AIDS even if you behave recklessly. Now what sort of message is that?" the President asked.
 
"Sixty percent less at risk? Then what about the forty percent? If you have got one hundred circumcised people and they live recklessly, and sixty percent don't get AIDS but forty do, what are you looking for?" he mused.
 
Addressing the international medical students' convention on child health at Makerere University on Wednesday, Museveni said such messages were sending wrong signals to the population, and caused apathy in the fight against HIV/AIDS. He said Uganda's success was because of the clear message that there is no cure at all for AIDS.
 
"The way we controlled AIDS was because of an unequivocal message that there is a sickness which is not curable, you get it through sex, and when you get it you die. Therefore, avoid all risky sexual behaviours," he said.
 
The President advised young people to abstain from sex through exercise and sports, until they had found a partner for marriage.
 
"What sort of sex is that when you are going out with somebody you are not sure of? Oba alina akawuka? Oba talina? (I wonder whether my partner is infected or not?)" he exclaimed amid laughter.
 
 
 
 
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