Back grey_arrow_rt.gif
 
 
NYC HIV Prevention Ad Controversy: "It's Never Just HIV," part of the city's campaign against a growing sense of indifference toward what it's like to live with HIV.
 
 
  in an effort to say that getting HIV is rough the ad says getting when you get HIV its not just HIV you are getting but also you are at a higher risk of getting dozens of diseases even if you take medications like osteoporosis, a disease that dissolves your bones, dementia, a condition that causes permanent memory loss, and you are 28 times more likely to get anal cancer, "its always not just HIV", stay HIV free always use a condom". Clearly, the aging concern has caught on!!!!
 
Dr. Monica Sweeney, Assistant Commissioner for the Bureau of HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control, which operates under the NYC Department of Health: Sweeney counters that media, even when dealing with topics like HIV/AIDS, is not responsible for people's feelings, adding, "Not everyone is going to agree with it, but we hope they remember it. Meanwhile, the Health Department has no intention of pulling the ad or dropping the campaign."...."In developing this video spot, we tested various approaches in focus groups. It was informed by that process and by lessons learned from our successful anti-smoking efforts." She notes that while some groups have opposed the campaign, others have supported it, such as Gay Men From African Descent......Krishna Stone, Assistant Director, Community Relations for New York's Gay Men's Health Crisis (GMHC)...."We are more than willing to have a discussion with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene about HIV prevention campaigns that do not use ineffective scare tactics [such as this one].... scare tactics do not work."......anything negative can be harmful and lead to further stereotyping......Gay Men's Health Crisis (GMHC), the nation's oldest HIV/AIDS prevention, care and advocacy provider, today joined the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD), the nation's leading lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) media advocacy and anti-defamation organization, to demand that the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene pull a sensationalistic and stigmatizing television public service announcement aimed at gay and bisexual men
 
SEE THE VIDEO of the AD:
 
Joe. My. God.: GLAAD & GMHC Call On NYC To Yank Graphic New HIV ...
 
Dec 14, 2010 ... GLAAD & GMHC Call On NYC To Yank Graphic New HIV Prevention Ad. GLAAD and the Gay Men's Health Crisis are calling on New York City to cease ... joemygod.blogspot.com/.../glaad-gmhc-call-on-nyc-to-yank-graphic.html
 
In a statement, the city's Department of Health said, "Silence is no solution when the number of new HIV diagnoses among" men having sex with other men is up by more than 50% in eight years.
 
"In developing this video spot, we tested various approaches in focus groups," said the statement. "The spot was informed by that process and by lessons learned from our successful anti-smoking efforts. It was also carefully vetted for technical accuracy.
 
The Health Department trumpeted the media campaign in a release last week, saying the video spots "promote condom use and partner reduction" in the gay community. The release said while HIV infection is no longer a "death sentence," living with HIV "is still no picnic."
 
The ad will run on cable and broadcast television for two weeks this month, and again for two weeks in January.
 
Because the spot uses stark images and stats (people with HIV are "28 times more likely to contract anal cancer") the public reaction has been extremely dichotomous. Sumathi Reddy, a Metropolis contributor at The Wall Street Journal touched on the controversy last night, but FishbowlNY decided to go a bit deeper. We spoke to Dr. Monica Sweeney, Assistant Commissioner for the Bureau of HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control, which operates under the NYC Department of Health, and Krishna Stone, Assistant Director, Community Relations for New York's Gay Men's Health Crisis (GMHC) about the role of media when taking on such a sensitive subject. The fact that we are even publishing this post is what matters most to Sweeney. "Silence is no solution when the annual number of new HIV diagnoses among young MSM is up by 50 percent in eight years," she says. "In developing this video spot, we tested various approaches in focus groups. It was informed by that process and by lessons learned from our successful anti-smoking efforts." She notes that while some groups have opposed the campaign, others have supported it, such as Gay Men From African Descent. Stone and the GMHC agree that the messages need to be out there, but she says one important factor is missing with the "It's Never Just HIV" ad: communication. [1] GMHC says the ad "could further stigmatize HIV/AIDS, as well as gay and bisexual men." New York City Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas Farley said, "HIV continues to take a major toll on men who have sex with men - regardless of whether they identify as gay - and the virus is spreading more each year in those under 30. This spot should serve as a wake-up call." They report that in a survey of 685 men who have had sex with men at least twice in the past six month, 40% reported having unprotected anal sex. The figure was 56% for those who were HIV-positive. Francisco Roque of GMHC told the Wall Street Journal that if the Health Department went about proving their point pretty tastelessly. "It really paints this picture of gay men as these sort of disease-ridden vessels, and so the message is really sort of, 'Stay away from gay men,'" he said. GLAAD President Jarrett Barrios also said, "While it's extremely important that we continue to educate New Yorkers about HIV/AIDS prevention, the sensationalized nature of the commercial. misses the mark in fairly and accurately representing what it's like to live with HIV/AIDS." [2]
 
New York, NY--Gay Men's Health Crisis (GMHC), the nation's oldest HIV/AIDS prevention, care and advocacy provider, today joined the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD), the nation's leading lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) media advocacy and anti-defamation organization, to demand that the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene pull a sensationalistic and stigmatizing television public service announcement aimed at gay and bisexual men. The PSA, which is intended to encourage condom usage among gay and bisexual men, claims that those with HIV face a higher risk of bone loss, dementia, and anal cancer. While older adults living with HIV may be at greater risk of these conditions, the PSA creates a grim picture of what it is like to live with HIV that could further stigmatize HIV/AIDS, as well as gay and bisexual men. [3]
 
Two leading gay and lesbian advocacy groups want a new city-sponsored public service announcement about HIV pulled off the airwaves, calling the television commercial sensational and stigmatizing. The graphic ad, which began airing last week, warns of the other health problems such as anal cancer and dementia that can be associated with HIV. The ad is part of a campaign by the city's Department of Health & Mental Hygiene that aims to combat complacency about the disease among gay men. [4] Watch this ad currently being aired by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Disgusted at the way it depicts gay men? Or maybe you're just happy that the ad is out there. These two views appear to sum up the reaction to the spot, titled "It's Never Just HIV," part of the city's campaign against a growing sense of indifference toward what it's like to live with HIV. [1]
 
Gay men are part of the prevention solution, not the problem." Both GLAAD and GMHC have reached out to the department to demand that the commercial be pulled and to offer to assistance with framing the conversation around HIV/AIDS more accurately. "While it's extremely important that we continue to educate New Yorkers about HIV/AIDS prevention, the sensationalized nature of the commercial, including its tabloid-like fear tactics, misses the mark in fairly and accurately representing what it's like to live with HIV/AIDS," said GLAAD President Jarrett Barrios. "It's our hope that the department will work with us to create a PSA that promotes safety and solutions, rather than stigma and stereotype." From the very beginning of the epidemic, gay men have been developing courageous and innovative solutions to reducing HIV, often lending their prevention activism to communities of color and heterosexual people. [3] The Gay Men'''s Health Crisis, an HIV/AIDS prevention and advocacy group, and the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation, say the ad creates a grim portrait of being an HIV patient, which could further stigmatize victims. '''It really paints this picture of gay men as these sort of disease-ridden vessels, and so the message is really sort of, '''Stay away from gay men,'''' said Francisco Roque, director of community health for GMHC. Roque said the ad had a '''horror movie''' like quality with eerie music that appeared to demonize gay men. [4] In San Francisco, public health officials and advocacy groups have been holding community meetings to discuss the PrEP trial, which included 120 MSM from the city. "We have a responsibility to work with the HIV/AIDS community on this potentially exciting intervention," said Dr. Grant Colfax, the city's HIV prevention director. [5]
 
The sex workers urged Parliament to review the clauses on mandatory testing, disclosure of a person's HIV status and the criminalisation of intentional spread of the disease. They were led by their executive director, Macklean Kyomya. The sex workers argued that if enacted, the Bill would discriminate against them with respect to HIV prevention and care. The HIV Prevention and Control Bill 2010, which is being reviewed and discussed by the parliamentary committee on HIV/AIDS, requires mandatory disclosure of one's HIV status to their sexual partners. It also gives medical doctors power to disclose HIV-positive patients' status to people who are in close contact with them if there is risk of infection. [6] The HIV Prevention and Control Bill 2010, which is under scrutiny by the Parliamentary committee on HIV/AIDs, if enacted, it requires mandatory disclosure of one's HIV status to sex partners. The bill states that a medical practitioner who carries out an HIV test will give an HIV-positive person reasonable time to disclose his or her status to the partner. If the person fails to do so, the doctor on behalf of the client, will disclose to the partner It also gives powers to a medical doctor to disclose to people who are in close and continuous contact with an HIV-positive person if there could be a risk of them getting HIV through this person. [7]
 
 
 
 
  icon paper stack View Older Articles   Back to Top   www.natap.org