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White House AIDS Czar Jeff Crowley Leaving Post
 
 
  This letter from White House AIDS Czar Jeff Crowley just distributed:

Friends and colleagues,

I am writing to let you know that I have made the decision to leave my position as the Director of the Office of National AIDS Policy (ONAP) and Senior Advisor on Disability Policy at the end of this year. There is never a good time to make this type of transition and there is always more work to be done and more opportunities in front of us. After developing and releasing the National HIV/AIDS Strategy for the United States and spending a year and a half on implementation, now is an appropriate time for me to move on to the next phase of my life.

I have been incredibly fortunate to serve in President Obama's Administration and contribute to his important work on behalf of the American people. I cannot fully express how honored I feel to have been given the task of leading the process to develop our country's first comprehensive National HIV/AIDS Strategy. I am grateful to the HIV community and our many, many partners inside and outside of government that helped us develop a roadmap for moving forward at this critical juncture in our Nation's response to the domestic HIV epidemic. I am very proud of what we have accomplished together and I will leave knowing that we wrote a report that has not been soon forgotten, and we developed an evidence-based plan built on the lessons of the past 30 years that has and will continue to be implemented long after my tenure at ONAP. I am also grateful to the many members of the disability community with whom I have worked on issues related to health and long-term services and supports, civil rights, housing, and other issues.

I will continue to serve in the White House through the end of the year, and the White House has already begun the process for finding my replacement. Regardless of who that is, the President has said that the implementation of the Strategy cannot fall to the Federal government alone. I know that the President is deeply committed to responding to HIV epidemic in the United States and around the globe and that he will continue to need your strong support. I am humbled by the opportunity I have had to work at the White House and I would like to thank all of you who have been critical partners, personal supporters, and committed advocates on behalf of people living with HIV and other people with disabilities.

Jeff

Jeffrey S. Crowley

Director, Office of National AIDS Policy and Senior Advisor on Disability Policy

The White House

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National AIDS Policy Director steps down

November 3, 2011washingtonblade.com

Jeff Crowley, Director of the Office of National AIDS Policy at the White House, announced today that he will leave his position at the end of the year.

"After developing and releasing the 'National HIV/AIDS Strategy for the United States' and spending a year and a half on implementation, now is an appropriate time for me to move on to the next phase of my life," Crowley wrote in an open letter to colleagues on Thursday.

"I cannot fully express how honored I feel to have been given the task of leading the process to develop our country's first comprehensive National HIV/AIDS Strategy," Crowley's letter continued. "I am grateful to the HIV community and our many, many partners inside and outside of government that helped us develop a roadmap for moving forward at this critical juncture in our Nation's response to the domestic HIV epidemic."

Crowley who played double duty in the administration as the Senior Advisor on Disability also discussed his work in that arena in his announcement.

"I am also grateful to the many members of the disability community with whom I have worked on issues related to health and long-term services and supports, civil rights, housing, and other issues."

Crowley's departure comes just weeks after the sudden resignation of his boss, the top domestic policy advisor in the White House, Melody Barnes, which leaves the administration with two major leadership openings on the domestic policy front.

"Jeff has been integral to establishing the country's first comprehensive national HIV/AIDS strategy," said Brian Hudjich Executive Director of Washington D.C. based AIDS services research organization, HealthHIV. "He was accessible, approachable and clearly committed to receiving input from the community in helping address the needs of everyone impacted by HIV."

Crowley once served as Deputy Executive Director for Programs at the National Association of People with AIDS, and may now follow several other prominent HIV/AIDS officials who have gone back into the world of think tanks and not-for-profit organizations. In June of 2010, Shannon Hader, a former official with President Bush's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief resigned her position as top HIV/AIDS official for the District of Columbia to take a position with health care think tank The Futures Group. Crowley could also pursue work in policy for people with disabilities after he leaves his position at the end of the year.

Crowley's letter states the White House has already begun the process of finding his replacement, and will keep the implementation of the national strategy a priority in the coming months.

Crowley's resignation will leave room for new health care experts to take a role in influencing domestic policy on AIDS/HIV. AmfAR Vice President and Director of Public Policy Chris Collins could be one candidate. Many consider Collins' 2007 paper 'Improving Outcomes: Blueprint for a National AIDS Plan for the United States,' the foundation on which the National HIV/AIDS Strategy was built.

Also likely to be considered would be Crowley's deputy director, Greg Millet, who has worked closely with the roll out of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy since its earliest days.

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examiner.com:

Jeff Crowley, Director of the Office of National AIDS Policy, announced yesterday that he is resigning from his post effective in December. He stated that there is never really a good time to leave a position like his and that he is ready to move on to the next phase of his life. Crowley was appointed to the position in 2009 by President Obama. He previously served as Deputy Executive Director for programs at the National Association of People with AIDS, Senior Research Scholar at Georgetown University's Health Policy Institute and a Senior Scholar at the University's O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law. In a statement last night at the Road to AIDS 2012 town hall meeting, a somber Crowley told the audience "I'm not going away or disappearing forever. I just want to make sure everyone keeps moving toward a common path to really seize the moment we have right now."

Crowley stated in his email regarding his resignation that he is simply ready to move on from ONAP. He has spent most of his time in office developing and implementing the National HIV/AIDS Strategy. He has toured the country, visiting many community meetings, briefings and conferences to collect feedback from a diverse audience that has pledged to support the plan. Crowley said at the town hall meeting that it is important that we all continue with the plan. "We have a strategy now which does provide a roadmap. Hopefully the strategy will provide coordinated steps that we can all do to get better results."

 
 
 
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