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Obama pledges $50M to combat HIV/AIDS: $35 million for ADAP, additional $15 million to provide services and treatment to an increased number of patients at HIV medical clinics
 
 
  "We're committing an additional $15 million for the Ryan White program that supports care provided by HIV medical clinics across the country. Let's keep their doors open so they can keep saving lives. And we're committing an additional $35 million for state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs," Obama said in a speech in Washington.....[from California govt officials: "Patients today are developing the illnesses associated with aging that are seen in the general population....20 percent of people with HIV don't know they are infected"] ..............Obama has certainly raised expectations from his administration by these statements and promises on World AIDS Day, let's see how things roll out, particularly the $35 million for ADAP, and the additional 15 million for services & treatment in HIV medical clinics.

-excerpts from news reports including from Henry Kaiser Foundation reports:

December 1, 2011 President Obama, who's been under pressure from AIDS advocacy groups to do more to help patients with the virus on Thursday announced plans to step up the fight against AIDS, by making a modest commitment of an extra $50 million for domestic treatment and promising to provide more drugs to to people living with AIDS internationally. President Obama told activists, patients, scientists and business leaders gathered in Washington on Thursday to mark World AIDS Day that his administration will do more to get life-extending antiretroviral drugs for those infected with HIV - both in the United States and in low-income countries..Obama said the goal would be to treat 6 million people, presumably referring globally, infected with the human immunodeficiency virus that causes AIDS - a 50 percent increase over the current goal of 4 million. Officials said this wouldn't come through higher spending, presumably referring to global treatment, but rather through making the program more efficient. "In the area of treatment, President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has driven down its cost per year per patient on treatment from over $1100 to $335 in FY 2011," the White House said in a statement.

Clinton spoke, by video link from Florida, made a suggestion that took much of the audience by surprise. He proposed that Congress allow generic versions of patented AIDS drugs to be sold in the United States under certain circumstances for the next two years. Currently, these generic copies, mostly made in India, are only to be used in low-income countries because they are still protected by patents in the United States and other rich countries.....in New York City, the city with the highest number of people in the country infected with HIV, Health Commissioner Thomas Farley announced a new strategy to provide medicines immediately to any person diagnosed with HIV, according to The Associated Press. The costs for the new protocol - as much as $15,000/year - would fall on private insurers and the state's ADAP program, according to New York City health officials.The standard protocol for HIV medication had been to postpone drugs until an HIV patient's immune system is weakened.....The White House says the new overseas initiatives will also aim to deliver drugs 1.5 million infected pregnant women to protect their newborns from HIV; distribute 1 billion condoms over the next two years; and pay for 4.7 million men to be circumcised in eastern and southern Africa over the next two years. Research has shown that men who are circumcised are less likely to become infected. Former president George W. Bush addressed the audience via satellite from Tanzania, a country that has greatly benefited from PEPFAR, which Bush initiated."We are a blessed nation in the United States of America, and I believe we are required to support effective programs that save lives," Bush said. Obama called Bush's policy on AIDS one of his "greatest legacies." Obama and Bush were joined by former president Bill Clinton and other global advocates for AIDS relief including singer Bono.

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KQED: [California] HIV/AIDS Cases Up Most for People of Color. Dec 1 2011

Timed to today's observance of World AIDS Day, California's Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development released a brief [PDF] looking at over 20 years of hospitalization trends for people with HIV and AIDS. The state's analysis showed that the number of people living with HIV and AIDS is up most significantly among blacks and Hispanics. Between 1988 and 2008, the number of white people with HIV/AIDS had nearly doubled, but the number of cases for blacks had more than tripled and were up more than five times for Hispanics. Native Americans and Asian/Pacific Islanders with HIV/AIDS were also up dramatically, although these groups represent a small percentage of the total number of Californians living with HIV/AIDS.

The State's analysis looked in detail at hospitalization rates for people with HIV/AIDS and found they have dropped dramatically, largely due to the introduction of antiretoviral therapy in 1997. Other findings include:

· Cases in women are up significantly, more than sixfold since 1988. While HIV/AIDS overwhelmingly affects men, today women make up about 10 percent of total cases.

· The patient population is older. 70 percent of people with HIV/AIDS are between ages 40-64, a big change since 1988, when the majority of cases were in people ages 20-39. Patients today are developing the illnesses associated with aging that are seen in the general population.

· Hospitalization for mental and alcohol/drug-related issues more than doubled.

Public health officials encourage people to get tested for HIV. "One important way we can prevent the spread of HIV is to ensure that everyone knows their HIV status," said Dr. Ron Chapman, Director of the California Department of Public Health in a statement.

Nationally, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention says 20 percent of people with HIV don't know they are infected. Without effective HIV treatment, patients are at greater risk of developing AIDS. "HIV medications not only help HIV infected persons live longer, healthier lives, but also decrease the chance that they will transmit HIV," Dr. Chapman added.

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HHS Press Release Dec 1 2011

President Obama announces new efforts to end the AIDS epidemic in the United States


President Barack Obama today announced accelerated efforts to increase the availability of treatment to people living with HIV/AIDS in the United States in conjunction with World AIDS Day 2011. The president directed the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to invest approximately $50 million in new funding to support AIDS Drug Assistance Programs in states and increase access to HIV/AIDS care services.

"President Obama has laid out a compelling vision that has the power to change the course of the epidemic," said HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. "Now it's up to all of us to make our National HIV/AIDS Strategy real. Treatment not only improves and extends the lives of people living with HIV, but it also drastically reduces their risk of spreading the virus. Today we have a unique opportunity to significantly alter the course of the AIDS epidemic in the United States."

The president emphasized that critical HHS resources will help ensure that HIV-positive Americans get the best care and treatment possible. HHS will commit approximately $35 million in new funding and enhanced technical assistance through the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to support state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs so that approximately 3,000 people living with HIV/AIDS will have access to life-saving medications. In addition, HHS will provide $15 million in new funding to support experienced community-based providers of care for individuals with HIV/AIDS.....Of the $50 million, $15 million will be directed to the Ryan White Part C program for HIV medical clinics across the country, targeting areas with HIV infections have increased and HIV care and treatment services are not readily available. This additional funding will allow services to 7,500 more patients across the country. $35 million in increased funding will go to state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs to support grants to states to help nearly 3,000 individuals with HIV/AIDS access life-saving HIV/AIDS drugs. Currently, there are more than 6,500 Americans with HIV/AIDS who are on waiting lists for lifesaving medications. Earlier this year, there were more than 9,000 people on waiting lists, the Administration negotiated additional funding that enabled States to reduce the size of their waiting lists by nearly one-third.

As part of today's announcement, HHS will sponsor new activities focused on improving adherence to medications and encouraging consistent access to HIV care. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 34 percent of HIV/AIDS patients do not receive consistent care and only 28 percent of HIV/AIDS patients have their HIV under control. Consequently, HHS will help providers improve quality of health care delivered and states monitor and improve the continuum of HIV care for patients.

Today's announcement builds upon the Obama Administration's new testing initiatives to help the estimated 240,000 Americans living with HIV who are not aware that they are infected. For example, CDC has launched a new campaign to encourage testing among one of the hardest hit populations in the United States, black men who have sex with men. Testing Makes Us Stronger is part of Act Against AIDS, CDC's national campaign to bring attention to the importance of HIV prevention and testing. In 2012, CDC will also be working with partners to expand its successful campaign for African American women.

Recognizing that the federal government's efforts are only part of the solution, President Obama also applauded commitments by other public and private sector partners to expand and improve HIV/AIDS care services. The National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors announced a new agreement with Gilead Sciences to extend additional voluntary discounts and rebates for most Gilead medications purchased by state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs, as well as a continued price freeze through 2013.

LA Times: Los Angeles Times: Obama Redirects $50 Million To Fight AIDS

Obama is reallocating money that Congress already has approved for public health purposes, directing $35 million to state AIDS drug assistance programs and $15 million to the Ryan White program, which supports care provided by HIV clinics. As part of the overseas initiative, the U.S. will provide anti-retroviral drugs over the next two years to 1.5 million HIV-positive pregnant women so that they won't pass on the virus to their children. In an effort to reduce transmission of the virus in eastern and southern Africa, Washington will distribute more than 1 billion condoms and support more than 4.7 million voluntary medical male circumcisions, a procedure that dramatically reduces the risk of female-to-male transmission.

Washington Post: The Washington Post: Obama Proposes Helping More People Get Access To AIDS Drugs

President Obama told activists, patients, scientists and business leaders gathered in Washington on Thursday to mark World AIDS Day that his administration will do more to get life-extending antiretroviral drugs for those infected with HIV -- both in the United States and in low-income countries (Brown, 12/1). About 6,600 low-income HIV-positive people are on drug waiting lists in 12 states. The new money would pay for medication for about 3,000 people. The cost of medicine for people using state-sponsored AIDS drug assistance programs (ADAPs) was $11,388 per person last year. The audience of about 300 people gave Obama a standing ovation when he said the government's overseas AIDS program will seek to get 6 million people on antiretroviral therapy by the end of 2013. At the moment, treatment for about 3.9 million is underwritten by the President's Emergency Program for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). The more ambitious schedule won't need additional funding, but will require greater efficiencies in the global AIDS program, which President George W. Bush started in 2003. Its budget this year is $6.6 billion, and in recent years it has worked hard to, among other things, streamline drug procurement and delivery in 80 countries with PEPFAR-funded programs. Bush spoke by video link from Tanzania, along with that country's president, Jakaya Mrisho Kikwete. Bush, his wife and two daughters are in Africa to promote his charitable foundation's efforts to improve screening for and treatment of breast and cervical cancer. Former president Bill Clinton also spoke, by video link from Florida, making a suggestion that took much of the audience by surprise. He proposed that Congress allow generic versions of patented AIDS drugs to be sold in the United States under certain circumstances for the next two years. Currently, these generic copies, mostly made in India, are only to be used in low-income countries because they are still protected by patents in the United States and other rich countries.

In two years, "the economic picture will be better and the health-care reimbursement system will be different," Clinton said, referring to the start of near-universal health insurance through the Obama administration's Affordable Care Act.

The people who would be eligible for low-price generic medication would presumably be those now receiving them through state AIDS drug assistance programs, or on ADAP waiting lists. Details of his proposal were not available.

"That is a proposal that deserves serious consideration," said Anthony S. Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the branch of the National Institutes of Health chiefly responsible for U.S. AIDS research.

ADAPs help buy AIDS medicine for about 200,000 Americans with HIV. The programs, which exist in every state, had total budgets of $1.8 billion last year, with about $850 million provided by the federal government.

The GW event was sponsored by ONE and (Red), two advocacy organizations fighting disease and poverty, principally in Africa. It featured a roundtable discussion, led by CNN correspondent and physician Sanjay Gupta, that included U2 singer Bono, singer Alicia Keys, the chairman of Coca-Cola, two members of Congress, an American religious leader, a South African woman who lost a daughter to AIDS and is herself infected and a Ghanaian physician.

The speakers repeatedly thanked the United States for spending money to save people who aren't Americans from death by AIDS.

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For Immediate Release

December 01, 2011

White House FACT SHEET: The Beginning of the End of AIDS

Today is a remarkable day. Today, we come together, as a global community, across continents, faiths and cultures, to renew our commitment to ending the AIDS pandemic - once and for all. --President Obama, December 1, 2011

Combating a Global Pandemic

FACT SHEET: The Beginning of the End of AIDS | The White House

www.whitehouse.gov/the-press.../2011/.../fact-sheet-beginning-end-a...


Dec 1, 2011 - Today, we come together, as a global community, across continents, ... --President Obama, December 1, 2011 ... Today, President Obama announced new prevention goals for ... In Fiscal Year 2011 alone, the United States supported: ... which supports one-stop clinics offering an array of health services

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World AIDS Day Statements and Reaction to President Obama's ...

www.lgbtpov.com/2011/
.../world-aids-day-statements-and-reaction-t...

by Karen Ocamb on December 1, 2011 | 6:06 PM. President Obama announced new commitments to fight AIDS in the US at the "The Beginning of the End" event .... and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. .... UNAIDS congratulates United States' leadership to end AIDS

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President Obama Sets Course for Dramatically Reducing the Impact of HIV Disease

12/01/2011

Statement from HIV Medicine Association (HIVMA) Chair Judith A. Aberg, MD, FIDSA


Today President Obama made a bold and important move in combating HIV disease by announcing a new initiative that commits to putting six million people with HIV on treatment globally by 2013 and investing much needed new resources in HIV care and treatment through the Ryan White Program. The president's new initiative is a critical step toward achieving the "AIDS-free generation" envisioned last month in a speech by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

We are at a pivotal moment in the HIV pandemic where the science shows a clear path for making serious headway against HIV disease. It is well documented that with early and reliable access to HIV care and treatment, people with HIV disease can lead healthy and productive lives. Findings from the National Institutes of Health HPTN 052 study early this year offered clear evidence that in addition to benefiting the HIV-infected individual, HIV treatment also significantly reduces the risk of transmitting HIV infection.

As we mark World AIDS Day and the 30th year since the first documented AIDS cases, we commend the president, and others, like the New York City Health Department, for advancing a comprehensive, evidence-based response to this deadly disease. New York City announced today a change in policy recommending all patients with HIV be offered treatment regardless of their CD4 count, a standard measure of the strength of the immune system.

We now turn to the U.S. Congress to do their part by ensuring that the Affordable Care Act is fully implemented and funded, investing in HIV care and treatment through the Ryan White AIDS Drug Assistance Program and Part C, and sustaining funding for the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria. We also call on other heads of state around the world to follow the president's lead by investing in AIDS now to put us firmly on course for the beginning of the end of the AIDS pandemic.

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Statement Ryan White Medical Providers Coalition

Today on World AIDS Day, the Ryan White Medical Providers Coalition commends President Barack Obama, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, and Jeff Crowley, Director of the Office of National AIDS Policy, for committing an additional $50 million to expand access to HIV/AIDS medication and treatment.

Now is a critical moment in the fight to end the HIV pandemic. Scientific research findings unequivocally show that early access to treatment improves health outcomes for people with HIV and significantly reduces HIV transmission. The first-ever National HIV/AIDS Strategy provides a roadmap for reducing HIV infections, increasing access to care, and addressing health disparities. Today's commitment of $35 million to the Ryan White AIDS Drug Assistance Program and $15 million to the Ryan White Part C Program to provide HIV/AIDS medication and treatment both will save lives and help meet the strategy's important goals.

World AIDS Day Statement by

Kevin Carmichael, MD, FIDSA and James Raper, DSN, CRNP, JD, FAANP

December 1, 2011


Today on World AIDS Day, the Ryan White Medical Providers Coalition commends President Barack Obama, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, and Jeff Crowley, Director of the Office of National AIDS Policy, for committing an additional $50 million to expand access to HIV/AIDS medication and treatment. As a national coalition of frontline HIV/AIDS medical providers, we know first hand the critical need in our communities for increased access to life saving HIV/AIDS medical services, and we applaud the Obama Administration's leadership in making the availability of HIV medication and treatment a priority.

HIV/AIDS remains a significant and serious health concern in the United States with over 1.2 million people currently living with HIV and an estimated 50,000 new infections annually. Nearly 25% of persons with HIV who are in need of treatment do not having access to it, and a there are more than 6,500 people living with HIV waiting for medication assistance through the Ryan White AIDS Drug Assistance program. Expanding early and reliable access to HIV care and treatment helps people with HIV live healthy and productive lives and is cost effective. Investing in HIV prevention today translates into saved lives and less care and treatment spending in the future.

Now is a critical moment in the fight to end the HIV pandemic. Scientific research findings unequivocally show that early access to treatment improves health outcomes for people with HIV and significantly reduces HIV transmission. The first-ever National HIV/AIDS Strategy provides a roadmap for reducing HIV infections, increasing access to care, and addressing health disparities. Today's commitment of $35 million to the Ryan White AIDS Drug Assistance Program and $15 million to the Ryan White Part C Program to provide HIV/AIDS medication and treatment both will save lives and help meet the strategy's important goals. Of the approximately 1.2 million persons living with HIV/AIDS, approximately 240,000, or almost 1 in 4, of these individuals received services from Part C medical providers.

The Ryan White Medical Providers Coalition was formed in 2006 to be a voice for medical providers across the nation delivering quality care to their patients through Part C of the Ryan White Program. The Coalition represents HIV medical clinics in every region in the country, and advocates for a full range of primary care services for persons living with HIV/AIDS.

 
 
 
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