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HIV in the United States: At A Glance [Disproportionate HIV New Infections]
 
 
  https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/statistics/overview/ataglance.html
 
see slides below to see increases in new infections in men & MSM African American & Latino and White aged 25-34.....and the disproportionate affect by race..... Annual HIV infectionsa and diagnosesb are declining in the United States. The declines may be due to targeted HIV prevention efforts. However, progress has been uneven, and annual infections and diagnoses have increased among some groups.
 
HIV Infections
 
There were an estimated 38,500 new HIV infections in 2015. Among all populations in the United States, the estimated number of annual infections declined 8% from 2010 (41,800) to 2015 (38,500).
 
Gay and bisexual menc are the population most affected by HIV. In 2016:
 
o Gay and bisexual men accounted for 67% (26,570) of all HIV diagnoses and 83% of diagnoses among males.
 
o Black/African Americand gay and bisexual men accounted for the largest number of HIV diagnoses (10,223), followed by Hispanic/Latinoe (7,425) and white (7,390) gay and bisexual men.
 
Trends among gay and bisexual men have varied by race. From 2011 to 2015:
 
o Among white gay and bisexual men, diagnoses decreased 10%.
o Among African American gay and bisexual men, diagnoses increased 4%.
o After years of sharp increases, diagnoses among young African American gay and bisexual men (aged 13 to 24) stayed about the same.
o Among Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men, diagnoses increased 14%.

 
Heterosexuals and people who inject drugs (PWID) also continue to be affected by HIV. In 2016:
 
o Heterosexual contact accounted for 24% (9,578) of HIV diagnoses. o Women accounted for 19% (7,529) of HIV diagnoses (primarily attributed to heterosexual contact [87%, or 6,541] or injection drug use [12%, or 939]). o PWID accounted for 9% (3,425) of HIV diagnoses (includes 1,201 diagnoses among gay and bisexual men who inject drugs).
 
From 2011 to 2015:
 
o Diagnoses among all women declined 16%.
 
o Among all heterosexuals, diagnoses declined 15%, and among PWID, diagnoses declined 17%.

 
By race/ethnicity, African Americans and Hispanics/Latinos are disproportionately affected by HIV. In 2016:
 
o African Americans represented 12% of the population, but accounted for 44% (17,528) of HIV diagnoses. African Americans have the highest rate of HIV diagnoses compared to other races and ethnicities.
 
o Hispanics/Latinos represented 18% of the population, but accounted for 25% (9,766) of HIV diagnoses.
 
HIV diagnoses are not evenly distributed geographically. The population rates (per 100,000 people) of people who received an HIV diagnosis were highest in the South (16.8), followed by the Northeast (11.2), the West (10.2), and the Midwest (7.5).g
 
Diagnoses of HIV infection
 
From 2011 through 2015, the annual number and the rate of diagnoses of HIV infection in the United States decreased (Table 1a). In 2016, the rate was 12.3.
 
oAge group: From 2011 through 2015, the rate for persons aged 25-29 years increased. The rates for children (aged less than 13 years) and persons aged 13-14, 15-19, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64 years, and 65 years and older decreased. The rates for persons aged 20-24 and 30-34 years remained stable. In 2016, the highest rate was for persons aged 25-29 years (34.8), followed by the rate for persons aged 20-24 years (30.3).
 
oRace/ethnicity: From 2011 through 2015, the rates for American Indians/Alaska Natives, Asians, and Native Hawaiians/other Pacific Islanders increased. The rates for blacks/African Americans, whites, and persons of multiple races decreased. The rates for Hispanics/Latinos remained stable. In 2016, the highest rate was 43.6 for blacks/African Americans, followed by 17.0 for Hispanics/Latinos, 12.9 for persons of multiple races, 10.2 for American Indians/Alaska
 
Region: From 2011 through 2015, the rates of diagnoses of HIV infection in the Northeast and the South decreased. The rates in the Midwest and the West remained stable. In 2016, rates were 16.8 in the South, 11.2 in the Northeast, 10.2 in the West, and 7.5 in the Midwest.
 

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Source: CDC. Estimated HIV incidence and prevalence in the United States, 2010-2015. HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2018;23(1).
 

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Source: CDC. Diagnoses of HIV infection in the United States and dependent areas, 2016. HIV Surveillance Report 2017;28
 

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AIDS Diagnoses

In 2016, 18,160 people received an AIDS diagnosis. Since the epidemic began in the early 1980s, 1,232,346 people have received an AIDS diagnosis.
 
Living With HIV and Deaths
 
o An estimated 1,122,900 adults and adolescents were living with HIV at the end of 2015. Of those, 162,500 (15%) had not received a diagnosis.
 
o Young people were the most likely to be unaware of their infection. Among people aged 13-24 with HIV, an estimated 51% didn't know.
o In 2014, among all adults and adolescents with HIV (diagnosed or undiagnosed), o 62% received some HIV medical care,
o 48% were retained in continuous HIV care, and
o 49% had achieved viral suppression (having a very low level of the virus).h A person with HIV who takes HIV medicine as prescribed and gets and stays virally suppressed can stay healthy and has effectively no risk of sexually transmitting HIV to HIV-negative partners.
o From 1987 (the first year HIV was listed as a cause of death on death certificates) through 2015, 507,351 people died from HIV disease. In 2015, 6,465 people died from HIV disease.

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